Background Screening:

Creating a Culture of Transparency

Everyone involved in your ministry, both paid and volunteer, should be screened. Carefully screening people before allowing them to work in your ministry is one of the best ways to protect young people and other vulnerable individuals from harm.

How can churches balance safety, legal obligations, and privacy? This webinar will discuss the best practices for background screening in the ministry setting.

Original Broadcast Date: Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Run Time: Approximately 60 minutes

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What will you learn?

  • How to select a reputable screening service
  • Whom to screen
  • The legal issues involved if a ministry does not screen
  • What to do when a background check turns up a criminal record

About the presenters:

Steve Case

Steve Case, JD is an assistance vice president, senior corporate counsel, at Brotherhood Mutual Insurance Company. He assists ministries with risk management, focusing on the areas of child protection, worker screening, healthcare, Medicare, and tax. Case received his Juris Doctorate from the University of Toledo College of Law and is licensed by the Indiana Supreme Court. Prior to joining Brotherhood Mutual, he worked in insurance defense litigation. Steve is also active in his church, serving as the leader of the Men of Faith Growth Group.

Mike McCarty

Mike McCarty is the founder and CEO of SafeHiring Solutions, Inc., a background screening provider based in Danville, Indiana. Prior to starting Safe Hiring Solutions, McCarty was a violent crimes detective with the Metropolitan Police Department in Nashville, Tennessee. He has facilitated violence prevention training and consulting to organizations such as U.S. Homeland Security, National Sheriff’s Association, Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, Indiana Coalition Against Domestic Violence and numerous other state, local and private organizations.

McCarty photo courtesy of SafeHiring Solutions LLC.

The information provided in this webinar is intended to be helpful, but it does not constitute legal advice and is not a substitute for the advice from a licensed attorney in your area.